Societies’ “Issues” Are Not The Mirror To Our Souls

Shaun M. Johnson Personality, Society, Writing

Most everyone in this day and age are programmed at birth to believe that every Father was to slave all week being manly and “cookie-cutter” in his suit and tie or dirty, greasy overalls to “bring home the bacon”, leaving Mother all frail and in her smock to cook that bacon and clean up after everyone afterwards and throughout the next day. The seemingly universal ideology is that anyone outside of that “box of hypocrisy” is different and judged, most times with opinions screaming negativity. “Current views of the self in psychology diverge greatly from this early conception, positioning the self as playing an integral part in human motivation, cognition, affect, and social identity.”(Sedikides and Spencer)

Dynamics in society concerning the past social norm have very recently begun to shift. With the rise and constant evolution of technology and opportunity, computers causing the rise of the home-based business, men have the satisfaction of having a “job” (though not your conventional factory or office one) and doing his fair share of keeping the household. On the other hand, thanks to the Women’s Rights Movement, women can now “help Dad” and enjoy a successful career as an ambitious and persevering “co-breadwinner”, having nothing to do with reversing the gender role and causing Dad to feel like a “wimp” or “Mr. Mom”. In turn, may quite possibly lead to a centered, more sustainable household. What does the closed-minded majority think about that? In an article he had written called “Stay-at-Home Dads”, Glenn Sacks states, “My wife and I sometimes remark that if we had met in the era before women had real career opportunities, we’d both be pretty unhappy” (383). Being a stay-at-home Dad myself, with my own online businesses, I personally agree with Mr. Sacks and can still maintain my “manliness”.

One’s upbringing plays a huge role in the way they perceive others or how others perceive them. Certain events in one’s life also molds how they may think about themselves, their desires, preferences, inner-most thoughts, hopes, and dreams. Some grow to deal with the fact that they are different by maturely finding ways to channel that inner-confusion through writing, playing dress-up like Mommy or Madonna on the weekends and/or dancing around a pole in a local bar downtown. Michael Nava is a seemingly bright, homosexual, Latino author who once wrote an article called “Gardenland, Sacramento, California” in which he states “Like so many other bright children growing up in the inarticulate world of the poor, books fueled my imagination, answered my questions, led me to new ones, and helped me conceive of a world in which I would not feel so set apart” (373).

On the other side of that “gender less” spectrum, some people who are different than society’s “alleged majority norm” also grow to hate society. Blame society for hate and wonder why their voices aren’t heard. Who is society to judge? Likewise, who are they to judge and blame the entire society. There are open-minded people in this world who feel it is your right to “Just Be You”, who have homosexual family members or friends and accept them for “Who” they are, not “What”. ““We’re despised. We’re pariahs in our own society,” says Miranda Stevens-Miller, chair of the trans-gendered rights organization It’s Time, Illinois, about transsexuals an otherwise trans-gendered people” (378) concerning very unfortunate incidences involving wrongful deaths of “different” human beings in an article by E. J. Graff called the M/F Boxes. Hatred begets hatred as does “happiness begets more of the same. Who’s right?

In most cases, societal views on people who know or feel that they are different, inhibits the right for that person to express who they really are, inside and outside, quite possibly becoming afraid of what most people might think, therefore making them feel uncomfortable and ultimately prohibiting them to be themselves. What we are, what we choose to desire or love, and how we present ourselves has absolutely no bearing on the actuality of “Who” we are inside as decent, caring human beings.

Work Cited
Graff, E. J. “The M/F Boxes.” The Blair Reader Exploring Contemporary
Issues. Ed. Laurie G. Kirszner, Stephen R. Mandell. – 6th ed.
Pearson Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ. 2008. 374-379.
Nava, Michael. “Gardenland, Sacramento, California.” The Blair Reader
Exploring Contemporary Issues. Ed. Laurie G. Kirszner, Stephen R. Mandell.
– 6th ed. Pearson Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ. 2008. 367-373.
Sacks, Glenn. “Stay-at-Home Dads.” The Blair Reader Exploring Contemporary
Issues. Ed. Laurie G. Kirszner, Stephen R. Mandell. – 6th ed.
Pearson Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ. 2008. 382-384.
Sedikides, C. & Spencer, S. J. (Eds.) (2007). The Self. New York: Psychology Press